Corner Shower Layouts

Corner shower layouts are the second most prevalent ones we encounter (slightly behind simple wall-to-wall alcove shower layouts) in the DC Metro area. Corner showers come in one of two varieties typically. In DC, Maryland, and Virginia, there were a lot of homes built with a shower pan directly adjacent to a soaking tub, resulting in a layout like this:

Corner Shower w/ Buttressed Return Panel

Basically, the “return panel” (the panel that meets the front face of the shower at 90-degrees and runs all the way to the back wall) is a half panel. Sometimes this layout involves a knee wall instead of a tub deck, but the principle is the same: a piece of glass shorter than the door and inline panel at the front of the shower is needed to ensure that the finished height of the shower enclosure is the same on both sides that have glass.

This layout lends itself to swing door style shower enclosures as well as sliding shower enclosures. So that’s the first decision you nee to make when you have this layout:

Do I want a swing door? Or do I want sliding shower doors?

The most common approach to a corner unit with a swing door is to hinge the door of the wall using glass-to-wall hinges. Beside the door is an inline “notched panel,” which sort of looks like the state of Oklahoma flipped up on its panhandle. A notched panel has a cutout (minimum of 3/4″) that allows it to accommodate the tub deck or knee wall before meeting the buttressed return panel at 90-degrees, which then runs along the tub deck or knee wall to the back wall.

Corner Swing Units w/ Buttressed Return Panels

Corner Sliding Units w/ Buttressed Return Panels

Have a Corner Shower Layout in Need of Some Frameless Shower Doors?

We've got you covered! Fill out our online quote request form, and we'll walk you through your options, make some recommendations, and get you a firm estimate!

Corner Shower w/ Full Height Return

Not all corner showers sit directly adjacent to a tub deck, or have a knee wall running from the front face of the shower (where the door is located) to the back wall. Many customers prefer a simple square or rectangular pan with equal height glass on both sides.

This doesn’t change much on or our end. We don’t have to contend with the notched panel to accommodate the tub deck or knee wall, which saves you a little money – cutouts do cost extra in the fabrication process). However, the return panel is now full-height, and thus larger, increasing costs a little bit. Ultimately, it’s usually a wash (within tens, not hundreds, of dollars).

The basic hardware is the same either way too: hinges, handle, a corner clamp (for swing door units) to make sure the 90-degree joint is sturdy, and a clamp on the back wall to make sure the return panel is fully secured. All stationary glass sets in low-profile u-channel at the base 

Swing and Sliding Units w/ Full Height Returns

Have a Corner Shower Layout in Need of Some Frameless Shower Doors?

We've got you covered! Fill out our online quote request form, and we'll walk you through your options, make some recommendations, and get you a firm estimate!